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Home | Louisiana | Below Average Costs | November 25, 2017

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Finding the Best Places to Retire Since 2006!

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Short Review of Slidell, Louisiana

Leisurely Slidell (population 28,000) sits along the northeast shores of 630-acre Lake Pontchartrain in southeastern Louisiana and is just 25 miles northeast of New Orleans via a 24-mile long causeway across the lake. It started out as a manufacturing hub, producing lumber and then bricks. Several NASA facilities in surrounding communities brought growth in the 1960s and 1970s. Hurricane Katrina hit hard in 2005, flooding parts of the city with 15 feet of water. Many residents left, but today Slidell is growing once again.

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In fact, the city has blossomed by 15% within the last 10 years. Residents are generally conservative, and 38% of them are age 45 or better. Slidell is racially diverse, and 27% of locals have at least a four year college degree. The crime rate meets the national average. The cost of living is 7% below the national average.

The median home price is $155,000. Neighborhoods are populated with everything from bungalows and ranch ramblers to farmhouses and Cajuns. Many properties were built during the Victorian era when well-to-do New Orleanians headed to the "Northshore" for summer relaxation.

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Southern hospitality, and a bit of the "good ole boy" attitude, are hallmarks of this quiet town, and it has a cute, 10-square-block historic downtown. Cultural amenities are not in great supply, but annual festivals including the Bayou Jam Concert, the Art League's Artist of the Year Exhibit, the Fall Street Fair, the Arts Evening Festival and Christmas Under the Stars create a community bond.

Scenic bayous abound, and boating and fishing keep many a residents busy. With New Orleans so close, fun shopping, French Quarter strolling, professional football and dining in eclectic restaurants are close at hand. The Gulf itself is just a 45 minute drive away.

City parks keep Slidell looking green, and three golf courses, Oak Harbor, Pinewood and Royal, give duffers and low handicappers plenty of places to play. Tammany Trace is a 31-mile long paved trail, with a parallel equestrian path, that runs through not only Slidell but through four other towns as well and overlooks bayous and streams. Two wildlife preserves, the Bogue Chitto National Wildlife Refuge and the Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge, are home to endangered species, including the ringed-sawback turtle, the American alligator and the gopher tortoise. Canoe companies offer swamp tours.

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The St. Tammany Parish has a branch library that offers a library loan program, public computers with Internet access, computer classes, tax assistance and even books. When it comes to dining and shopping, there are some local BBQ joints and antique galleries, but chain restaurants are the norm. Shopping venues include national retailers (two Wal-Marts, Sears, Bed, Bath and Beyond, etc.).

There is no regularly scheduled public transportation, but goSTAT provides on demand, curb to curb transportation services in the rural and urban areas of Tammany County, including Slidell. Reservations are required, and prices are determined by miles traveled.

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Slidell Memorial Hospital is a teaching hospital and is accredited by the Joint Commission. Medicare patients are accepted, and 71% of patients would recommend SMH to a friend, which is above the national average. Ochsner Medical Center, Slidell's other hospital, is also accredited by the Joint Commission.

The Slidell Senior Center is managed by the Council on Aging St. Tammany (COAST) and is open to people age 60 or better. Services include noon congregate meals, delivered home meals, curb to curb van transportation within town limits, social activities, home repairs (restrictions apply), exercise classes, legal assistance and more.

Slidell sits in a humid subtropical climate and has hot, muggy summers with temperatures in the 80s and 90s. Winters are generally mild and a bit cooler than the south shore of New Orleans. Winter temperatures are in the 40s and 50s. On average, the area receives 62 inches of rain each year.

Hurricanes and the flooding that comes with them are always a threat (especially south of Interstate 12). Subsequent to Hurricane Katrina, Slidell suffered flood damage in 2012 (Hurricane Issac) and in August, 2016 (days of torrential rain). The tornado risk is 120% higher than the national average.

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Recommended as a Retirement Spot? Yes | Is Louisiana Tax-Friendly at Retirement? Yes

The hurricane threat should be considered, but Slidell's easygoing pace, reasonable cost of living, historic homes, cute "old town," good hospitals and solid senior programs make it worth a look at retirement time.

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Louisiana:

Louisiana is unique in that it is divided into parishes, which in other states are known as counties. In its early days, it was home to American Indians and was a French colony and a Spanish colony and saw an influx of African slaves. Even the British and Germans settled in the area in the 1700s. This mix of cultures gives many modern Louisiana towns a heritage not found anywhere else in the U.S.

In the early-1800s, President Thomas Jefferson, worried about having a foreign nation on the western border of the up and coming United States, wanted to purchase the port of New Orleans. Instead, his representatives negotiated for a land package that doubled the size of the U.S. literally overnight, and on October 20, 1803, the U.S. Congress ratified the Louisiana Purchase. The deal cost the U.S. 3 cents per acre and dramatically enlarged the young country without a shot on either size ever being fired.

People known as Cajuns and Creoles are dominant in the southern part of the state. Cajuns are descendants of French-speaking people who were expelled from Acadia (now Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, Canada) and then settled in what is now southwestern Louisiana in 1765. White Creoles are predominantly of French and Spanish ancestry, and Creoles of color are descendants of slaves who were born in either the French and Spanish colonies. Today, the term Louisiana Creole usually refers to people who are of mixed-race.

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Stats:

Population - 4,681,666

Persons 65 years old and over - 20%

High school graduates, persons age 25+ - 83% 

Bachelor's degree or higher, persons age 25+ - 22% 

Persons of Hispanic or Latino origin - 5% 

White persons, not Hispanic - 59% 

Median household income - $45,065 

Median home value - $144,100 

Social Security taxed? No

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

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